Corrosion-resistant Steel Sheet, Inquiry No. NQ-2019-002

March 23, 2020—The Canadian International Trade Tribunal today initiated an inquiry to determine whether the dumping and subsidizing of corrosion-resistant steel sheet, originating in or exported from the Republic of Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, have caused injury or retardation or are threatening to cause injury. This final injury inquiry was initiated further to a notice received from the Canada Border Services Agency stating that a preliminary determination had been made respecting the dumping and subsidizing of the above-mentioned goods.

Certain Concrete Reinforcing Bar.

On December 9, 2019, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT), pursuant to subsection 76.03(3) of the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA), initiated an expiry review of its finding made on January 9, 2015, in Inquiry No. NQ-2014-001, concerning the dumping of hot-rolled deformed steel concrete reinforcing bar in straight lengths or coils, commonly identified as rebar, in various diameters up to and including 56.4 millimeters, in various finishes, excluding plain round bar and fabricated rebar products, originating or exported from the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of Korea and the Republic of Turkey, and the subsidizing of the aforementioned goods originating or exported from the People’s Republic of China.

As a result of the CITT’s expiry review, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has today initiated an expiry review investigation (investigation) to determine, pursuant to paragraph 76.03(7)(a) of SIMA, whether the expiry of the finding is likely to result in the continuation or resumption of dumping and/or subsidizing of the subject goods. The CBSA will make a determination no later than May 7, 2020, and will issue a Statement of Reasons by May 22, 2020.

The subject goods are defined as:

“Certain hot-rolled deformed steel concrete reinforcing bar in straight lengths or coils, commonly identified as rebar, in various diameters up to and including 56.4 millimeters, in various finishes, excluding plain round bar and fabricated rebar products, originating or exported from the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of Korea and the Republic of Turkey”.

The product definition of the subject goods is found in Annex 1.

The subject goods are usually classified under the following 10-digit tariff classification numbers:

7213.10.00.00
7214.20.00.00
7215.90.00.90
7227.90.00.90

NRCan: Airbags no Longer Regulated

CBSA has advised that under Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan) Explosives legislation, airbags are no longer a regulated commodity.

Certain Corrosion-Resistant Steel Sheet

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) initiated investigations, on November 8, 2019, under the Special Import Measures Act respecting the alleged injurious dumping and subsidizing of certain corrosion-resistant steel sheet from Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Vietnam.

SECTION 146 AGAINST IMPORTER

A section 146 means you owe outstanding funds to CBSA. Once determined what the outstanding amount is for it can be paid at a customs office and your goods can clear into Canada.

Amendments to the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement (CIFTA)

Please note that effective September 1, 2019, the amended Declaration of Minor Processing (Form E669) must be completed for CIFTA-eligible goods that have undergone minor processing in the territory of a non-Party prior to entering Canada.

Milk protein substances with a milk protein content of 85% or more by weight.

Imports of milk protein substances (MPS) with a milk protein content of 85% or more by weight, calculated on the dry matter, that do not originate in a NAFTA country, an EU country or other CETA beneficiary, Chile, Costa Rica or Israel into Canada are subject to import controls under Canada’s Export Import Permit Act.

The purpose of this message is to inform importers that only products that qualify as “originating products” within the meaning of the concerned trade agreement are exempted from Canada`s import permit requirements for MPS.

Entry into force of the LRMA and Preclearance Act, 2016

The LRMA and Preclearance Act, 2016 entered into force on August 15, 2019.

In March 2015, Canada and the United States signed a new treaty entitled the Agreement on Land, Rail, Marine and Air Transport Preclearance between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States (LRMA), which was a commitment of the 2011 Beyond the Border Action Plan.

The LRMA provides for preclearance operations to be conducted in all modes of transport (i.e. land, rail and marine as well as air) as well as for cargo operations. Like the previous Air agreement, the LRMA permits either country to establish preclearance operations in the territory of the other country (i.e. Canada in the U.S. or the U.S. in Canada).

Canada’s treaty obligations under the Air agreement were implemented in Canadian law through the Preclearance Act of 1999. Similarly, Canada’s treaty obligations under the LRMA have been implemented in Canada through the modernized Preclearance Act, 2016.