Ready to Eat, retail packaged poultry food items from the United States.

As of September 19, 2022, cross-border shoppers will be allowed to bring a greater number of poultry products for human consumption back across the border from the United States, regardless of whether the state is currently experiencing an outbreak of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza or Newcastle Disease. These items must be retail packaged AND Ready to Eat, and must accompany the travellers across the border.

For more information, please consult the published Notice to Travellers.

What is allowed:
Rotisserie chicken (Retail barbecued, roasted or broiled)
Chicken soup and soup mixes
Hard boiled eggs
Chicken/turkey hot dogs
Chicken/turkey deli meats
Fully cooked chicken/turkey sandwiches, wraps, kabobs etc.

Changes to import requirements for poultry products and by-products from the UK.

On August 23, 2022, new import requirements for raw fresh/frozen poultry products and by-products from the United Kingdom (UK) will come into effect. This affects both edible and inedible products, and will harmonize import requirements with the UK for products imported from countries with outbreaks of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI). Additional animal health attestations in regards to HPAI will now be required for all shipments of raw fresh/frozen poultry meat and poultry products from the UK when there are active outbreaks of HPAI.

Any shipments certified on or after August 23, 2022 must be accompanied by the updated attestation requirement. There will be a transition period of two months (until October 23, 2022) during which product will be accepted for import using either the previous or new conditions.

Canada puts in place temporary handgun import ban.

Canadians deserve to feel safe in their communities. That is why the Government of Canada has a comprehensive plan that gets firearms off our streets and more resources into our communities. A central part of this is the recently introduced Bill C-21. The bill addresses the alarming role of guns in gender based violence, gets tough on organized crime and most significantly introduces a national freeze on the sale, transfer and ownership of handguns, anywhere in Canada.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and the Honourable Marco Mendicino, Minister of Public Safety, today announced a temporary import ban on the importation of restricted handguns. This will help bring the ultimate impact of the national handgun freeze into force sooner. This temporary ban means that individuals and businesses will no longer be able to import handguns into Canada, subject to narrow exceptions that mirror those in Bill C-21. These restrictions will take effect on August 19th, 2022, and will last until the national freeze comes into force.

No single program or initiative can tackle the challenge of gun violence on its own. That is why Bill C-21 and the national freeze on handguns are two of the many elements in the Government’s comprehensive plan to keep Canadians safe. This begins at our borders, where we’ve added resources to fight smuggling and stop guns from coming into Canada. We’re also investing in prevention programs to tackle the root causes of gun crime and stop it before it starts. Finally, we banned assault-style weapons like AR-15s, and will soon begin a buyback program to get these weapons of war out of our communities once and for all.

Restriction on imports of live birds, bird products and by-products from states affected by Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in the United States.

All raw poultry and all poultry products and by-products that are not fully cooked and canned or hermetically sealed, including eggs and raw pet foods, sourced, processed, or packaged from the restricted zones in the states below are under restriction until further notice. You may not bring these items into Canada.

If you buy poultry or eggs in the United States (U.S.), make sure you have proof that they originate from and were purchased in a region other than those under restriction. Poultry and birds (including pet birds) originating from the restricted zones in the states below are under restriction until further notice. Furthermore, all live birds, including poultry and hatching eggs cannot transit through the restricted zones or any part of states that are completely banned.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has implemented measures to protect Canada’s poultry resources from outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza reported in poultry in the following states:
Colorado
Idaho
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Maine
Maryland
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Utah
Washington
Wisconsin

Government announces details about the implementation of Luxury Tax.

Today, the Government of Canada announced clarifications to the implementation of the Luxury Tax, which was included in Bill C-19 (An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on April 7, 2022 and other measures), which received Royal Assent on June 23, 2022.

First, an amendment made to Bill C-19 during the legislative process authorizes the Governor in Council to set the coming into force date of the Luxury Tax as it applies to aircraft. The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance has accordingly recommended to the Governor in Council a coming into force date of September 1, 2022, for all subject items, including aircraft.

Furthermore, the government intends to release draft regulations in the near term that would clarify that the existing transitional provisions in Bill C-19 for the Luxury Tax will continue to apply to all subject items, including aircraft. These regulations would provide that the Luxury Tax is relieved from a subject item, if a written sales agreement in respect of the subject item was entered into before January 1, 2022.

Second, the government intends to release draft regulations in the near term that, effective September 1, 2022, would relieve the Luxury Tax on sales of certain aircraft for export at the time the sale is completed by a registered vendor, even if the exportation occurs at a later time. This refinement would mitigate certain cash flow issues raised by Canadian manufacturers and exporters of aircraft. Following feedback from stakeholders at the conclusion of the public consultation, this refinement provides an administratively similar approach to achieving the overarching objective of the legislation and is consistent with the government’s longstanding commitment to exempt export sales.

Third, the government intends to release draft regulations in the near term that would simplify and reduce the reporting requirements, effective September 1, 2022, for automotive vendors that are registered with the Canada Revenue Agency. These regulations would eliminate the requirement for these vendors to complete certain information returns.

Notice of preliminary determinations, Mattresses, China July 8, 2022

On July 7, 2022 the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), pursuant to subsection 38(1) of the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA), made preliminary determinations of dumping and subsidizing with respect to certain mattresses from China.

The subject goods are usually classified under the following tariff classification numbers:

9404.21.00.00
9404.29.00.00
Note that the tariff classification numbers are for convenience of reference only. Refer to the product definition for authoritative details regarding the subject goods.

Provisional duties will now be payable on the subject goods that are released from the CBSA on or after July 7, 2022. Where amounts of dumping and/or subsidy are considered insignificant, the investigations will continue but provisional duties will not be payable.

Additional information about these investigations is contained in a Statement of Reasons, which will be available within 15 days.

For assistance in properly completing accounting documents and the payment of provisional duties, please consult the Guide for Self‑assessing SIMA duties.

CFIA Changes to service fees now in effect for select importers

As of July 4, 2022, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will be making the following service changes at the Centre of Administration for Permissions:

Change in timing of invoicing and fee collection
To reflect the current costs of delivering CFIA services, the CFIA will charge the service fee when you apply for an animal and plant import permit, or Ministerial Exemption for fresh fruits and vegetables. This includes new applications, renewals and amendments. If your permission is not issued, you will not be refunded.
Streamlining channel for applications
Applications for plant and animal import permissions will only be accepted through My CFIA or postal mail. Email applications will no longer be accpeted.
Charging Ministerial Exemptions for fresh fruit and vegetables by the number of loads requested on the application.
Applications for Ministerial Exemptions for fresh fruit and vegetables will be charged the service fee for the consideration of an application at the time of submission and based on the number of loads as per the CFIA Fees Notice.

Changes to import requirements for poultry products and by-products from the EU.

On July 1, 2022, new import requirements for raw fresh/ frozen poultry products and by-products from the European Union (EU) will come into effect. This affects both edible and inedible products, and will harmonize import requirements with the EU for products imported from countries with outbreaks of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI). Additional animal health attestations in regards to HPAI will now be required for all shipments of raw fresh/frozen poultry meat and poultry products from EU member states affected by HPAI.

Any shipments certified on or after July 1, 2022 must be accompanied by the updated attestation requirement. There will be a transition period of two months (until September 1, 2022) during which product will be accepted for import using either the previous or new conditions.

Customs Notice 22-12: Ukraine Goods Remission Order

1. The purpose of this Customs Notice is to advise of the Ukraine Goods Remission Order, effective June 9, 2022, for goods that originate in Ukraine. This order is being initiated under section 115 of the Customs Tariff.

2. Remission is granted of the customs duties paid or payable under the Customs Tariff in respect of goods that originate in Ukraine for one year from the date of registration (June 9, 2022).

3. For purposes of the Customs Tariff, goods originate in Ukraine if their last production process, other than a minimal operation, occurred in Ukraine.

4. For the purposes of the Customs Tariff, minimal operation means any of the following:

(a) an operation to ensure the preservation of a good in good condition for the purposes of transport and storage;
(b) the packaging, re-packaging, breaking up of consignments or putting up a good for retail sale, including placing a good in bottles, cans, flasks, bags, cases or boxes;
(c) a mere dilution with water or another substance that does not materially alter the characteristics of the good;
(d) the collection of goods intended to form sets, assortments, kits or composite goods; and
(e) any combination of operations referred to in paragraphs (a) to (d).
5. Remission is also granted of the duties paid or payable under the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA) in respect of goods that originate in Ukraine.

6. For the purposes of the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA), goods originate in Ukraine if they acquired their physical and technical characteristics in Ukraine.