CARM: CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management

The Canada Revenue Agency continues to issue the required business number (BN9). The CBSA has taken over RM account-related services.

Until October 2024:

Please register your RM in advance to avoid the storage fees, as CBSA can process it in up to 10 business days. For non-resident importers, as per our practice, this could take longer.

When you have an urgent situation, CBSA allows for the use of your Customs Broker BN/ account as a one-time exemption.

ARGO Customs Brokers can assist you when your commodities do not require a CFIA SFC food license and no other permits.

If you have an urgent shipment and your RM account is not yet ready, please contact us at Email: info@argocustoms.com for assistance.

CBSA launches investigation into the alleged dumping of certain concrete reinforcing bars from Bulgaria, Thailand, and the United Arab Emirates

The Canadian government is taking action to protect domestic businesses and jobs from unfair international competition. The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has launched an investigation into the alleged dumping of certain concrete reinforcing bars imported from Bulgaria, Thailand, and the United Arab Emirates.

This investigation follows a complaint filed by major Canadian steel producers – AltaSteel Inc., ArcelorMittal Long Products Canada, Gerdau Ameristeel Corporation, Max Aicher North America Ltd., and Ivaco Rolling Mills 2004 LP. The complainants claim that the influx of dumped imports from these countries has caused material injury to their businesses, resulting in lost market share, sales, price undercutting, price depression, price suppression, reduced capacity utilization, and negative impacts on financial performance.

Investigation Schedule of Events

The investigation process involves two key government bodies: the CBSA and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT). By July 2, 2024, the CITT expects to have made a decision regarding its preliminary investigation into whether the imports are harming Canadian producers. Concurrently, the CBSA will investigate whether these imports are being sold in Canada at unfair prices, with a preliminary decision due by August 1, 2024.

This action is part of Canada’s efforts to maintain a fair and competitive business environment for domestic manufacturers and producers. Currently, there are 150 special import measures in force, covering a wide range of industrial and consumer products, from steel to refined sugar. These measures have directly helped to protect approximately 30,000 Canadian jobs and $11 billion in Canadian production.

ARGO Customs Brokers Can Help You Navigate the Regulations Stipulated by the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA)

The Special Import Measures Act (SIMA) is a law that the CBSA enforces to shield Canadian producers and manufacturers from unfair foreign import competition. SIMA specifically addresses anti-dumping and countervailing actions for imported goods.

By taking proactive steps to investigate and address unfair pricing practices, the Canadian government aims to foster a level playing field for domestic businesses and safeguard the interests of Canadian workers and the economy.

If you are planning to import goods into Canada, it is advisable to consult with ARGO Customs Brokers to ensure compliance with SIMA and other import regulations. We can provide you with detailed information about applicable duties and any special measures related to your specific goods.

Helpful Links:

CARM Portal – Action Required

To our valued clients,

We are reaching out to remind you to activate your business on the new Canada Border Services Agency Assessment and Revenue Management system (CARM) online portal.

On May 13th, 2024, CARM becomes CBSA’s official accounting software system.

Legacy Shutdown

CBSA’s legacy accounting system will go offline from April 26th to May 13th, 2024. It’s important to note that final accounting will not be completed during this period.

CBSA will be stopping registration on the CARM Client Portal as of April 26th, 2024 and will not be reopening it until May 13th, 2024

Important information regarding the cutover period is required for the CBSA to migrate existing systems and functionality to CARM systems and functionality for the CARM R2 May 13, 2024 implementation. The CARM R2 cutover period will extend from April 26 (4:00 pm EDT) to May 13 (3:00 am EDT).

Impact on Goods

The electronic submission system for goods will experience downtime starting late in the evening on Saturday, April 27th, and is anticipated to resume early in the morning on Sunday, April 28th. CBSA has not yet released the precise times for this interruption. ARGO CB will process all entries received within a sufficient time frame before the system goes offline. Beyond this 10-hour maintenance window, the transition plan is designed to ensure that the clearance of goods remains unaffected, allowing your goods to continue clearing as usual. CBSA is dedicated to maintaining the smooth flow of trade during this period.

Important Update

If you haven’t registered and authorized us as a broker in the CARM Portal by May 13th, 2024, we will be unable to process or clear your shipments. This could cause delays and result in extra charges from carriers or warehouses as all commercial imports will be restricted. Once CARM R2 is live, you will be unable to import into Canada without having your business activated on the portal.

ARGO Customs Brokers for the Win!

Stay in contact with ARGO Customs Brokers for all information related to importing to or exporting from Canada. Whenever you have questions on CARM-related issues or need assistance with importing or exporting, our agents are available to help.

Changes to Import Requirements for Pet Supplements

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is modernizing and simplifying import requirements for pet supplements containing animal products and by-products. We are writing to give you advance notice of changes to import requirements that will be published on June 24, 2024.

Key Takeaways:

1. Simplified categorization of pet supplements

The current categories for pet supplements in the Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) do not accurately reflect the variety of options available on the market. On June 24, 2024, the CFIA will update AIRS to include only 3 categories:

a) Pet supplements with no animal origin ingredients

b) Pet supplements containing only highly processed animal origin ingredients

c) Pet supplements containing animal origin ingredients that are not highly processed

Highly processed animal origin ingredients:

  • Albumin
  • Bee-derived products
  • Chondroitin sulphate
  • Collagen
  • Dicalcium phosphate
  • Egg and egg products
  • Fish oils
  • Gelatin and gelatin capsules
  • Green lipped mussel powder
  • Marine materials that are not rendered (other than fish oil and green lipped mussel powder)
  • Milk and milk products
  • Tallow
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin D3 from lanolin

Non-highly processed animal origin ingredients:

  • Meat
  • Organs
  • Offal
  • Bone or meat meal
  • Bone broth
  • Spray dried plasma or other blood derivatives, including blood meal
  • Products of a rendering plant (other than fish oil and green lipped mussel powder)

Pet supplements with no animal origin ingredients will be allowed from any country, with a copy of the label or manufacturer’s ingredient list. Pet supplements with animal origin ingredients must be accompanied by a zoosanitary certificate. AIRS will be updated to specify whether pet supplements will be accepted or refused from each country, making it easier for importers to find the information they want.

2. Zoosanitary Certification

The zoosanitary certificates for pet supplements with animal origin ingredients will allow the official veterinarian of the exporting country to cross out ingredients that are not included in the shipment being certified. Also, different types of supplements in the same shipment will be able to be certified using the same zoosanitary certificate, as long as they are all in the same category of highly processed or non-highly processed.

Helpful Links:

The ARGO Customs Brokers Team Is Ready to Serve You

If you have any questions or need assistance regarding the changes to Import Requirements for Pet Supplements, please reach out to ARGO Customs Brokers. We are here to assist you. Contact us today for any import/export services or any information you may require.

Natural Health Products (NHP) and AIRS

Health Canada regulates natural health products (NHPs) so that Canadians can have confidence that the products they use are safe, effective, and of high quality. Labels are an important tool to assist Canadians in making informed health choices when selecting and using NHPs.

Health Canada has amended the Natural Health Products Regulations to make NHP product labels easier to read and understand. These changes support consumers in selecting and safely using NHPs. For more information and to access the supporting Labelling of Natural Health Products guidance document, visit What’s New: Natural and non-prescription health products.

Key Takeaways

Under the Natural Health Products Regulations, which came into effect on January 1, 2004, natural health products (NHPs) are defined as:

  • Probiotics
  • Herbal remedies
  • Vitamins and minerals
  • Homeopathic medicines
  • Traditional medicines, such as traditional Chinese medicines
  • Other products like amino acids and essential fatty acids

Choose “other end uses” as the commodity use designation when importing.

The Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) is a reference tool that shows the import requirements for Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) regulated commodities. AIRS is a Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) tool that utilizes a series of questions to determine the admissibility requirements of animals, plants, and food items.

The Canadian Society of Customs Brokers (CSCB) recently initiated an inquiry for a natural health product, and ARGO Customs (as a corporate CSCB member) wants to share this information as you may find the answer beneficial when using AIRS.

Q:   Natural health products are not regulated as food, yet when using AIRS and selecting “for human consumption,” the requirement for an SFC licence is listed. Why is this occurring?

A:    In fact, there are products that are for humans to consume per se (e.g., NHPs), for which brokers should not be selecting “for human consumption.” We typically say that “for human consumption” is reserved for foods subject to the licence requirements of the Safe Food for Canadians regulations.

Although NHP are technically for humans to consume, you’re correct that they aren’t regulated as “food” and so “for human consumption” shouldn’t be used. Maybe the best advice I can give is to think about it this way:

  1. If the commodity is regulated as a food under the SFCR and is not subject to any exemptions or exceptions, choose “for human consumption.”. The Conditions of Import in AIRS for “other end uses” list these exemptions/exceptions.
  2. If the commodity is regulated as a food under the SFCR and is subject to an exemption/exception – choose “other end uses.”
  3. If the product is consumed but not regulated as a food (e.g., NHPs, pharmaceutical products), choose “other end uses.”

Helpful Links

Forms, templates, and guidance documents from Canada.ca:

The CSCB (Canadian Society of Customs Brokers) actively seeks and achieves improvements in government policies and procedures on behalf of our members and their clients and consistently delivers relevant, high quality products and services, including education and professional development. The CSCB creates member value and benefits through education, advocacy, information, and innovation.

If you or your business need assistance with these import regulations, please do not hesitate to contact ARGO Customs Brokers. ARGO is always available for consultation regarding importing into Canada and exporting globally.

CBSA Trade compliance verifications: January 2024

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has a specific approach to the verification of commercial goods destined for Canada. Trade compliance verification reports represent a large part of ongoing efforts to ensure trade compliance.

Key Takeaways

To be trade compliant, the importing community must meet all of the requirements governing the accounting of commercial goods imported into Canada, including, but not limited to:

  • classifying their commercial goods under the appropriate tariff classification
  • accurately declaring the origin and value of the goods, in accordance with legislative requirements
  • paying the appropriate duties and taxes on the goods

The CBSA monitors the extent to which commercial goods are trade compliant by conducting targeted verifications and issuing verification priorities.

The January 2024 Trade Compliance Verification priorities are as follows:

Tariff verification priorities are:

  • Freezers and other freezing equipment – Harmonized System Number(s): Headings 84.18
  • Washer and Dryers – Harmonized System Number(s): Headings 84.50 and 84.51
  • Spent fowl – Harmonized System Number(s): Headings 02.07, 16.01, and 16.02
  • LED lamps – Harmonized System Number(s): Heading 85.39
  • Furniture for non-domestic purposes – Harmonized System Number(s): Headings 94.01 and 94.03
  • Parts of lamps – Harmonized System Number(s): Heading 94.05
  • Cell phone cases – Harmonized System Number(s): Headings 39.26, 42.02 and 85.17
  • Pickled vegetables -Harmonized System Number(s): Heading 20.01
  • Parts of machines and mechanical appliances – Harmonized System Number(s): Heading 84.79
  • Bicycle Parts – Harmonized System Number(s): Heading 87.14
  • Parts for Use with Machinery of Chapter 84 – Harmonized System Number(s): Heading 84.31
  • Indicator Panels and Light-Emitting Diodes (LED) – Harmonized System Number(s): Headings 85.31 and 84.41
  • Safety Headgear (Round 5) – Harmonized System Number(s): Subheading 6506.10
  • Disposable and Protective Gloves (Round 5) – Harmonized System Number(s): Subheadings 3926.20 and 4015.19

Valuation priorities are:

  • Apparel – Harmonized System Number(s): Chapters 61 and 62, with an emphasis on assists
  • Most-Favoured-Nation tariff treatment withdrawn from Russia and Belarus
  • Effective March 2, 2022, the Most-Favoured-Nation (MFN) tariff treatment no longer applies to goods imported into Canada that originate in Russia or Belarus.
  • This includes goods shipped:
    • directly from Russia or Belarus
    • from a third country

You must now account for these goods under the General Tariff rate of customs duty of 35%.

Helpful Links

Argo Customs Brokers Is at Your Service

If you have any questions or need assistance regarding the effects that the trade compliance verifications may have on your business, please reach out to Argo Customs Brokers. Our team of experts is here to help you navigate the requirements of the CBSA. Contact us today for any import/export services or information you may require.

New Sanctions and Export Controls in Response to Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine

The Canada Border Services Agency Assessment issued Customs Notice 22-01: New Sanctions and Export Controls in Response to Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine (modified December 8, 2023) to inform importers and exporters about measures imposed by the Government of Canada under the Special Economic Measures Act (SEMA) since February 24, 2022, in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

In addition to the following economic measures, as of February 24, 2022, Global Affairs Canada has also stopped the issuance of new permits under the Export and Import Permits Act (EIPA) for the export and brokering of controlled strategic, dual-use, and military goods and technology to Russia.

Exporters with valid permits for the export or brokering of items to Russia prior to this date have had their permits cancelled. Only permits and applications related to specific end-uses such as medical supplies and humanitarian needs, may be considered exceptions on a case-by-case basis. Please see Notice to Exporters No. 1071, Export and Brokering of Items, listed on the Export Control List and the Brokering Control List to Russia.

Key Takeaways

Goods subject to import sanctions imposed under the Special Economic Measures (Russia) Regulations include, but are not limited to:

  • Petroleum (any good referred to in column 1 of Schedule 5);
  • Luxury goods (any good referred to in column 1 of Part 2 of Schedule 6); as of December 5, 2023, among other articles, this list also includes:
    • Diamonds (unsorted, non-industrial, synthetic or reconstructed)
    • Articles of jewellery and parts thereof, of precious metal or of metal clad with precious metal
    • Articles of goldsmiths’ or silversmiths’ wares and parts thereof, of precious metal or of metal clad with precious metal
    • Articles of precious metal or of metal clad with precious metal
    • Articles of precious or semi-precious stones (natural, synthetic or reconstructed)
    • Wristwatches, pocket-watches and other watches, including stopwatches, with cases of precious metal or metal clad with precious metal.
  • Certain gold products (any good referred to in column 1 of Schedule 9), including unwrought gold, semi-manufactured gold, gold powder, monetary gold and jewellery made of gold;
  • Any type of weapon, ammunition, military vehicle or military or paramilitary equipment, or a spare part for any of those goods;
  • Steel and Aluminum products, as specified in Schedule 11;
  • Arms and related material.
  • Under the Special Economic Measures (Ukraine) Regulations, it is prohibited to:
    • import, purchase, or acquire goods, wherever situated, from: the Donetsk People’s Republic (DNR); the Luhansk People’s Republic (LNR); the Russian-occupied Kherson region of Ukraine; the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia region of Ukraine; the Crimea Region of Ukraine; or from any person in these regions.
    • export goods destined for: the Donetsk People’s Republic (DNR); the Luhansk People’s Republic (LNR); the Russian-occupied Kherson region of Ukraine; the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia region of Ukraine; the Crimea Region of Ukraine; or sell, supply, or transfer goods, wherever situated, to any person in these regions.

Helpful Links

 

 

For more information relating to sanctions, including the Special Economic Measures Act (SEMA) and associated regulations, or the process to apply for a permit or certificate under SEMA, please contact:

Sanctions Policy and Operations Coordination Division
Global Affairs Canada
Lester B. Pearson Building
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0G2
Telephone: 1-877-808-8838 (Toll free)
Email: sanctions@international.gc.ca

If you have any questions or need assistance regarding the effects that the New Sanctions and Export Controls in Response to Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine may have on your business, please reach out to Argo Customs Brokers. Our team of experts is here to help you navigate the requirements of the CBSA. Contact us today for any import/export services or information you may require.

Message to industry: Wheat products tariff rate quota (TRQ) – Quota will be filled on November 4, 2023

Issued by Global Affairs Canada on October 6, 2023

Global Affairs Canada has issued a message relating to imports of wheat products with the following Customs Tariff headings: 11.01, 11.03, 11.04, 11.08, 11.09, 19.01, 19.02, 19.04, 19.05, and 23.02.

The purpose of the message is to inform importers of wheat products that the 2023-2024 Wheat Products tariff rate quota will be filled as of 20:59 p.m. Ottawa time (EST) on November 4, 2023, and that the “within access commitment” tariff items will be closed at that time.

Key Takeaways

  • The wheat products tariff rate quota (TRQ) will be filled on November 4, 2023.
  • Consequently, November 4, 2023 (at 20:59 p.m. Ottawa time EST) will be the cut-off date for accounting for imports of all wheat products classified under a “within access commitment” tariff item number.
  • All imports of wheat products accounted for after the cut-off date and time will be classified at the “over access commitment” tariff item number, even if they were imported (or imported and released) before the quota has been filled.
  • After the TRQ level is reached, some wheat products that qualify under the U.S., Mexican, Chilean, Peruvian, Costa Rican, European, or United Kingdom’s tariff will continue to be assessed at the “within access” lower rate of duty.

Helpful Links

A Notice to Importers explaining this action is available on the Government of Canada website:

Notices – No. 1072 – Wheat, Barley and their Products

More Information

If you have questions about this particular tariff, the Government of Canada offers this email address: wheat.barley-ble.orge@international.gc.ca.

If you have questions or require assistance, please reach out to Argo Customs Brokers. Our team of experts is here to help you navigate all government requirements. Contact us today for any import/export services or information you may require.

Cbsa Kicks Off Final Phase Before CARM Becomes the New System of Record for the Collection of Duties and Taxes for Commercial Goods Imported Into Canada

The Canada Border Services Agency Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM) is a multi-phase project to modernize the collection of duties and taxes for commercial goods imported into Canada.

The CBSA has taken a phased approach to making it the official system of record for the collection of duties and taxes for commercial goods imported into Canada. In October 2023, the CARM Release 2 system will be available for selected industry partners who want to test their own internal systems and for software service providers to continue to certify their software with CARM.

Key Takeaways

  • The proposed regulatory amendments continue on schedule, with a planned date of May 2024, when CARM becomes the official system of record. Further enhancements are expected to become available in fall 2024.
  • A forum will be established with key stakeholders to discuss the implementation of this phased approach and the application of regulations in support of CARM.
  • To ease the transition to CARM, all commercial businesses that import goods into Canada are to register now on the CARM Client Portal, ahead of May 2024.

Helpful Links

If you have any questions or need assistance regarding the effects that the changes to CARM may have on your business, please reach out to Argo Customs Brokers. Our team of experts is here to help you navigate the requirements of the CARM Client Portal. Contact us today for any import/export services or information you may require.

General Export Permit – Dual-use Goods and Technology to Certain Destinations

General Export Permit – Dual-use Goods and Technology to Certain Destinations

Amended by Global Affairs Canada on September 1, 2023

Dual-use items are goods and technologies that may be used for both civilian and military purposes. Dual-use export controls cover a wide range of products and technologies and affect not only manufacturers but also transport providers, academia, and research institutions.

  1. The purpose of this Notice is to advise exporters that, pursuant to the Export and Import Permits Act, the Minister of Foreign Affairs has amended a General Export Permit (GEP) relating to the export or transfer of certain dual-use goods and technology identified in Group 1 and in item 5504 of the Export Control List (ECL) /“A Guide to Canada’s Export Control List” (the Guide) to certain eligible destinations. This Notice to Exporters replaces an earlier Notice dated August 2015, which has been archived.
  2. On September 1, 2023, General Export Permit No. 41 (GEP-41) was amended to add a new category to the list of “unauthorized goods and technology” under paragraph 3(2)(e). Specifically, paragraph 3(2)(e) now prohibits the use of GEP-41 for the export or transfer of goods or technology that are intended for the development, production, or use of rocket systems or unmanned aerial vehicles with a range of 300 km or greater.

Helpful Links

General Export Permit No. 41 – Dual-use Goods and Technology to Certain Destinations

Additional Information

The full text of this regulation and its accompanying Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement is available in the August 12, 2015 edition of the Canada Gazette, Part II.

The Notice to Exporters for GEP No. 41 – Dual-use Goods and Technology to Certain Destinations can be found on the Export Controls Division website: www.exportcontrols.gc.ca