Notice of close of record and updated schedule: Carbon and Alloy Steel Line Pipe 2 (LP2 2023 UP1)

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) initiated a normal value and export price review on January 29, 2020, to update all normal values and export prices of specific carbon and alloy steel line pipe (line pipe) that SeAH Steel Corporation (SeAH) exported from the Republic of Korea to Canada.

The review came after an importer asked for a new decision to be made. It is a component of the CBSA’s enforcement of the Special Import Measures Act’s (SIMA) requirements for the dumping of line pipe from the Republic of Korea as stated in the Canadian International Trade Tribunal’s (CITT) injury finding from January 4, 2018.

The schedule for this normal value and export price review is available on the CBSA’s website at: www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/sima-lmsi/up/menu-eng.html. The CBSA has now updated the website to announce that the record has been closed. Interested parties have seven days from the close of the record to file case arguments concerning the normal value and export price review and 14 days from the close of the record to file reply submissions in respect of the case arguments.

Normal values established during this review will apply to subject goods released from the CBSA on or after the conclusion date. The normal values and export prices determined as a result of this review may be applied to any requests for re-determination of importations of subject goods that have not been processed prior to the conclusion of the review, regardless of the date that the requests were received. The normal values and export prices determined as a result of this review may be applied retroactively where the conditions described below are met.

Key Takeaways

  • Exporters must promptly inform the CBSA of any changes to domestic prices, costs, market conditions, or terms and channels of sale. If there are increases in domestic prices or costs, the export price for sales to Canada should be increased accordingly. Failure to notify the CBSA or adjust export prices may result in retroactive assessments of anti-dumping duties.
  • In order to avoid secondary dumping, companies must increase resale pricing to unrelated customers in Canada when related parties are involved. If a company raises its selling prices in Canada to eliminate all secondary dumping, export prices will be calculated under Section 24 of SIMA. Price reviews will be conducted to ensure an appropriate selling price is maintained in the Canadian market. If a company is found to be in a secondary dumping situation, anti-dumping duties may be assessed retroactively.

Helpful Links:

Please ask ARGO Customs Brokers to assist you in checking and estimating your SIMA duty (when your goods could possibly be under SIMA duty regulations) in advance. Having full and detailed information about SIMA duty is very important to making a proper estimation of what you’d pay here in Canada. It’s good to have it before your load departs from the country of export.